Category Archives: Activities

They’re Here! Math You Can Play Weekend Sale

Finally, the first two books of my math games series are finished and loaded up on Amazon.com (and the other Amazons worldwide). To celebrate, I’m offering an introductory sale price this weekend: US$2.99 per book, now through Monday.

Math Your Kids WANT To Do

Are you tired of flashcards and repetitive worksheets? Now your children can practice their math skills by playing games.

Math games pump up mental muscle, reduce the fear of failure, and develop a positive attitude toward mathematics. Through playful interaction, games strengthen a child’s intuitive understanding of numbers and build problem-solving strategies. Mastering a math game can be hard work, but kids do it willingly because it is fun.

Counting & Number Bonds: Math Games for Early Learners, Preschool to 2nd Grade

Counting-Games

Counting & Number Bonds features 21 kid-tested games, offering a variety of challenges for preschool and early-elementary learners. Young children can play with counting and number recognition while they learn the basic principle of good sportsmanship, to respond gracefully whether they win or lose. Older students will explore place value, build number sense, and begin practicing the math facts.

Buy now at:

Addition & Subtraction: Number Games for Elementary Students, Kindergarten to 4th Grade

Addition-Games600x800

Addition & Subtraction features 22 kid-tested games, offering a variety of challenges for elementary-age students. Children will strengthen their understanding of numbers and develop mental flexibility by playing with addition and subtraction, from the basic number facts to numbers in the hundreds and beyond. Logic games build strategic thinking skills, and dice games give students hands-on experience with probability.

Buy now at:

Don’t Have a Kindle?

You don’t need a Kindle device to read Amazon ebooks. Click here to download the Kindle program for your computer, phone, or tablet.

For those of you who prefer to buy ebooks from iTunes, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, etc.‌—‌those versions are coming soon! The epub book format takes a bit more work, but I’m hoping for time to finish it up within a week or so.

Paperback editions are also in the works.


Featured photo above by Richard Riley via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).


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Math Game: Thirty-One

Math Concepts: addition to thirty-one, thinking ahead.
Players: best for two.
Equipment: one deck of math cards.

How to Play

Lay out the ace to six of each suit in a row, face up and not overlapping, one suit above another. You will have one column of four aces, a column of four twos, and so on‌—‌six columns in all.

The first player flips a card upside down and says its number value. Players alternate, each time turning down one card, mentally adding its value to the running total, and saying the new sum out loud. The player who exactly reaches thirty-one, or who forces the next player to go over that sum, wins the game.

31-Game

Variation

For a shorter game, use only the ace to four of each suit. Play to a target sum of twenty-two.

History (and a Puzzle)

Thirty-One comes from British mathematician Henry Dudeney’s classic book, The Canterbury Puzzles. According to Dudeney, “This is a game that used to be (and may be to this day, for aught I know) a favourite means of swindling employed by card-sharpers at racecourses and in railway carriages.”

Dudeney challenges his readers to find a rule by which a player can always win: “Now, the question is, in order to win, should you turn down the first card, or courteously request your opponent to do so? And how should you conduct your play?”


Dudeney, H. E. The Canterbury Puzzles, Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1919 (originally published 1907); available at Project Gutenberg or the Internet Archive.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/27635
https://archive.org/details/canterburypuzzle00dudeuoft


Addition-Games600x800

This post is an excerpt from my book Addition & Subtraction: Math Games for Elementary Students, coming this spring to bookstores all over the Internet.


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Math Game: Chopsticks

Feature photo above by Harry (Phineas H) via Flicker (CC BY 2.0).

Math Concepts: counting up to five, thinking ahead.
Players: two or more.
Equipment: none.

How to Play

Each player starts with both hands as fists, palm down, pointer fingers extended to show one point for each hand. On your turn, use one of your fingers to tap one hand:

  • If you tap an opponent’s hand, that person must extend as many extra fingers on that hand (in addition to the points already there) as you have showing on the hand that tapped. Your own fingers don’t change.
  • If you force your opponent to extend all the fingers and thumb on one hand, that makes a “dead hand” that must be put behind the player’s back, out of the game.
  • If you tap your own hand, you can “split” fingers from one hand to the other. For instance, if you have three points on one hand and only one on the other, you may tap hands to rearrange them, putting out two fingers on each hand. Splits do not have to end up even, but each hand must end up with at least one point (and less than five, of course).
  • You may even revive a dead hand if you have enough fingers on your other hand to split. A dead hand has lost all its points, so it starts at zero. When you tap it, you can share out the points from your other hand as you wish.

The last player with a live hand wins the game.

When a two-points hand taps a one-point hand, that player must put out two more fingers.
When a two-points hand taps a one-point hand, that player must put out two more fingers.

Variations

House Rule: Do you want a shorter game? Omit the splits. Or you could allow ordinary splits but not splitting fingers to dead hands.

Nubs: All splits must share the fingers evenly between the hands. If you have an odd number of points, this will leave you with “half fingers,” shown by curling those fingers down.

Zombies: (For advanced players.) If a hand is tapped with more fingers than are needed to put it out of the game, it comes back from the dead with the leftover points. For instance, if you have four fingers out, and your opponent taps you with a two-finger hand, that would fill up your hand with one point left over. Close your fist, and then hold out just the zombie point. In this variation, the only way to kill a hand is to give it exactly five points.

History

Finger-counting games are common in eastern Asia—and they must be contagious, since my daughters caught them from their Korean friends at college. Middle school teacher Nico Rowinsky shared Chopsticks (which is simpler than the version my daughters brought home) in a comment on the “Tiny Math Games” post at Dan Meyer’s blog.


Counting-Games

This post is an excerpt from my book Counting & Number Bonds: Math Games for Early Learners, coming this spring to bookstores all over the Internet.


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April 2015 Math Calendar

Feature photo above by Kelly Sikkema via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).

AprilMathCalendar

Six years ago, my homeschool co-op classes had fun creating this April calendar to hand out at our end-of-semester party. Looking at my regular calendar today, I noticed that April this year starts on Wednesday, just like it did back then. I wonder when’s the next time that will happen?

A math calendar is not as easy to read as a traditional calendar — it is more like a puzzle. The expression in each square simplifies to that day’s date, so your family can treat each day like a mini-review quiz: “Do you remember how to calculate this?”

The calendar my students made is appropriate for middle school and beyond, but you can make a math calendar with puzzles for any age or skill level. Better yet, encourage the kids to make puzzles of their own.

How to Use the Math Calendar

At home:
Post the calendar on your refrigerator. Use each math puzzle as a daily review “mini-quiz” for your children (or yourself).

In the classroom:
Post today’s calculation on the board as a warm-up puzzle. Encourage your students to make up “Today is…” puzzles of their own.

As a puzzle:
Cut the calendar squares apart, then challenge your students to arrange them in ascending (or descending) order.

Help Us Make the Next Math Calendar

If you like, you may use the following worksheet:

Submission details here: Kids’ Project — More Math Calendars?


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Unending Digits… Why Not Keep It Simple?

Unending-digits

Unending digits …
Why not keep it simple, like
Twenty-two sevenths?

—Luke Anderson

Math Poetry Activity

Encourage your students to make their own Pi Day haiku with these tips from Mr. L’s Math:

And remember, Pi Day is also Albert Einstein’s birthday! Check out this series of short videos about his life and work: Happy Birthday, Einstein.

Wednesday Wisdom features a quote to inspire my fellow homeschoolers and math education peeps. Today’s quote is from Luke Anderson, via TeachPi.org. Background photo courtesy of Robert Couse-Baker (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.


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Calculating Pi with Real Pies

From Numberphile: “How accurately can we calculate Pi using hundreds of REAL pies? This video features Matt Parker, who believes this is the world’s most accurate pie-based Pi calculation.”

Pi Day is coming soon. Maybe you’d like to try a pi project with your family? Check out my Pi Day Roundup of links.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Fun with the Impossible Penrose Triangle

I found this delightful animation today:

Ball-travels-around-impossible-triangle

The ball is traveling around a shape that can’t exist in our real world: the Penrose triangle. This illusion is the basis for some cool art, like Escher’s Waterfall. And I’m using it in my Math You Can Play books as a design on the back of my playing cards:

A-2-3deck

Want to Play Around with the Penrose Triangle?

Here’s a few links so you can try it for yourself:

Penrose Lego by Erik Johansson (CC BY 2.0)
Penrose Lego by Erik Johansson (CC BY 2.0)

Book Update

Addition-Games

I’ve sent the first two Math You Can Play books to a copy editor (she edits the text part), so my focus this month is on finishing the illustrations and downloadable game boards. And designing the book covers — I think I’ll call this latest iteration done.

If everything stays on schedule, both Counting & Number Bonds and Addition & Subtraction should be available by mid- to late-spring. Fingers crossed…


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.