Every Day Is Math Day

Happy 11-12-13

Happy 11/12/13, otherwise known as “tenty-one, tenty-two, tenty-three.”

Do your young children have trouble counting in the teens? Try making up Funny Numbers to help them! It’s a great habit to develop, because Funny Numbers will come in handy as mental math tools throughout their school math career.

If you’d like to make your own Happy Math Day post, check out the instructions here: Every Day Is Mathematics Day. And please share a link in the comments section below — I’d love to see what math holiday you invent!

Update: The numbers 11, 12, and 13 form an arithmetic progression. If that sounds too scary for your kids, check out Patrick’s bedtime math discussion Making Progress, Arithmetically.


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Math That Is Fun: Infinite Primes

Oh, my! Ben Orlin over at Math with Bad Drawings just published my new favorite math proof ever:

I had a fight with Euclid on the nature of the primes.
It got a little heated – you know how the tension climbs.

It started out most civil, with a honeyed cup of tea;
we traded tales of scholars, like Descartes and Ptolemy.
But as the tea began to cool, our chatter did as well.
We’d had our fill of gossip. We sat silent for a spell.
That’s when Euclid turned to me, and said, “Hear this, my friend:
did you know the primes go on forever, with no end?” …

15-eu-must-be-clidding

Click here to read the whole post at Math with Bad Drawings.


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Happy Square of a Square Day

3-19 Happy Square of a Square Day sign

In Response To

Make your own “Happy Math Day” sign:

Here’s a fun activity for any age that will encourage your children to play with numbers:


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Square One TV: The Mathematics of Love

The Engineer was away on a business trip, and Kitten and I were in the mood to veg out on YouTube, so I hunted for some golden oldies. We used to watch Square One TV faithfully, back when my eldest was in first grade. I can’t believe they haven’t released this show on DVD!

We found recordings of my two favorite songs (“Nine, Nine, Nine” and “8% of My Love”), but the picture quality was horrible. This video was the runner-up:


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Key Lime Pi

This may be my favoritest ever Pi Day T-shirt, designed by the admin over at 10-Minute Math. I admit it’s not very mathy, but I’ve always enjoyed word play, and I love key lime.

The design won a Reflection T-shirt Company contest and is now available to pre-order for only $8.99 (plus shipping). [Company seems to have gone out of business? Can't find their website...]

Unfortunately, it won’t be available in time for this Friday’s class.


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500 (?) and Counting

Celebrate
Photo by rileyroxx.

Could this be my 500th post? That doesn’t seem possible, even counting all those half-finished-and-then-deleted drafts. Well, at least it is my 500th something, according to the WordPress.com dashboard. And surely a 500th anything is worth a small celebration, right?

Maybe my students aren’t so bad, after all…

It has been awhile since I posted a link to Rudbeckia Hirta’s Learning Curves blog. Here are a few of her students’ recent bloopers:

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That’s Mathematics

Things are still hectic, but at least the phone company guy found the problem and got our “extended DSL” service working. “Extended DSL” is what you get when you live out in the boonies. No guarantees that it will be faster than the ancient modem, but at least it doesn’t tie up the phone line anymore.

And it is a bit faster, so I finally get to enjoy You Tube. If the video doesn’t display properly, you can find it at this link:

Funny Math Problems

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Rewriting the History of Math

Here are a couple of quick links to math in the news:


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A Very Short History of Mathematics

This paper was read to the Adams Society (St. John’s College Mathematical Society) at their 25th anniversary dinner, Michaelmas Term, 1948. [Warning: Do not attempt to read this while drinking coffee or other spittable beverage!]

Hat tip: I found this through the math carnival at a mispelt bog.

Update: The original page has disappeared from the internet, or at least I cannot find it any more, but the Internet Archive Wayback Machine came to the rescue. After my plea for help, James Clare pointed me to the article’s new home.


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Math Jokes

Blame it on MathNotations and his Corny Math Jokes (which actually included one I hadn’t heard before) — or maybe I have been reading too many of Chickenfoot’s strange tales — but anyway, I’m in a mood for humor.

So here are a couple of old favorites:

Eric W. Weisstein
from MathWorld–A Wolfram Web Resource

Hat tip: These had gotten lost in the dustbunnies of my memory until I saw the Frivolous Theorem mentioned recently at Art of Problem Solving.

Edited to add: Scott at Grey Matters recently updated his Mathematical Humor post, which may be where I had originally read these. He links to several more great MathWorld jokes, including the ever-tasty Pizza Theorem.


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Have more fun on Let’s Play Math! blog:

Spring Cleaning My Blog Links

Our whole family is coming down with something again. What a nuisance!

Since I don’t feel up to real cleaning, I guess it’s time to spruce up my sidebar. If you haven’t posted since November or December of last year, you’re outta there. And for those of you who use Blogger — well, I’m sorry, but if I get a persistent “Blogger: 404 – Page Not Found” then you’re gone, too. If you are still actively blogging, please send me an email.

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Secret Message

My algebra students could stand to hear this, too:

(2)(-4x2)n is not equal to (-8 )nx2n.

AAAAAARRRRGGGHH!!!!

From Secret Message to My Calculus Students at Learning Curves blog.


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Have more fun on Let’s Play Math! blog: