Math Teachers at Play #80 via Triumphant Learning

The new Math Teachers at Play math education blog carnival is up for your browsing pleasure. Each month, we feature activities, lessons, and games about math topics from preschool through high school. Check it out!

[Photo by Paul Downey. (CC BY 2.0 via Flickr)]

PaulDowney80

Welcome to the 80th Edition of the Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) blog carnival.

Before we dive into some math posts from around the web, let’s see what is special about the number eighty.

80 is…

  • how long it took Phileas Fogg to travel around the world in Jules Verne’s novel Around the World in Eighty Days.
  • 4 scores.
  • commonly used in the “80:20 rule,” which originated from Vilfredo Pareto, an Italian economist…

…And more! Click here to read the whole carnival, featuring 17 posts of mathy awesomeness!


Don’t miss any of our math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


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Education Bloggers: Share Your Post!

photo by Omar Omar via flickr

photo by Omar Omar via flickr

If you are a homeschooler or classroom teacher, student or independent learner, or anyone else who writes about math, now is the time to send in your favorite blog post for next week’s Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival.

Tweet: Education Bloggers: Share Your Post! Math education blog carnival open for submissions. http://ctt.ec/4zYQA+Don’t procrastinate: The deadline for entries is this Friday. The carnival will be posted next week at Triumphant Learning.

Click to tweet about the carnival:
(No spam, I promise! You will have a chance to edit or cancel the tweet.)

If you haven’t written anything about math lately, here are some ideas to get your creative juices flowing…

Need an Idea-Starter?

  • Elementary Concepts: As Liping Ma showed, there is more to understanding and teaching elementary mathematics than we often realize. Do you have a game, activity, or anecdote about teaching math to young students? Please share!
  • Arithmetic/Pre-Algebra: This section is for arithmetic lessons and number theory puzzles at the middle-school-and-beyond level. We would love to hear your favorite math club games, numerical investigations, or contest-preparation tips.
  • Beginning Algebra and Geometry: Can you explain why we never divide by zero, how to bisect an angle, or what is wrong with distributing the square in the expression \left(a + b \right)^2 ? Struggling students need your help! Share your wisdom about basic algebra and geometry topics here.
  • Advanced Math: Like most adults, I have forgotten enough math to fill several textbooks. I’m eager to learn again, but math books can be so-o-o tedious. Can you make upper-level math topics come alive, so they will stick in my (or a student’s) mind?
  • Mathematical Recreations: What kind of math do you do, just for the fun of it?
  • About Teaching Math: Other teachers’ blogs are an important factor in my continuing education. The more I read about the theory and practice of teaching math, the more I realize how much I have yet to learn. So please, fellow teachers, don’t be shy — share your insights!

Would You Like to Host the Carnival?

We need more hosts! Hosting the blog carnival can be a lot of work, but it’s fun to “meet” new bloggers through their submissions. And there’s a side-benefit: The carnival usually brings a nice little spike in traffic to your blog.

If you think you’d like to join in the fun, read the instructions on our Math Teachers at Play page. Then leave a comment or email me to let me know which month you’d like to take.

Explore the Other Math Carnivals

While you’re waiting for next week’s Math Teachers at Play carnival, you may enjoy:


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


factor game

Math Teachers at Play #79

79

[Feature photo above by Jimmie, and “79” image (right) by Steve Bowbrick via flickr (CC BY 2.0).]

Do you enjoy math? I hope so! If not, browsing this post just may change your mind.

Welcome to the 79th edition of the Math Teachers At Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival — a smorgasbord of links to bloggers all around the internet who have great ideas for learning, teaching, and playing around with math from preschool to pre-college.

Let the mathematical fun begin!

By tradition, we start the carnival with a puzzle, game, or trivia tidbits. If you would like to jump straight to our featured blog posts, click here to see the Table of Contents.

Since I’ve been spending all my free time working on my upcoming Math You Can Play book series, I’m in the mood for games. So I found a few games featuring prime and nonprime numbers [which category is #79 — do you know?], and I’ll sprinkle some of my best-loved math game books throughout the carnival.

TRY THESE NUMBER GAMES

Students can explore prime and non-prime numbers with two free classroom favorites: The Factor Game (pdf lesson download) or Tax Collector. For $15-20 you can buy a downloadable file of the beautiful, colorful, mathematical board game Prime Climb. Or try the following game by retired Canadian math professor Jerry Ameis:

Factor Finding Game

FactorFindingGame

Math Concepts: multiples, factors, composites, and primes.
Players: only two.
Equipment: pair of 6-sided dice, 10 squares each of two different colors construction paper, and the game board (click the image to print it, or copy by hand).

On your turn, roll the dice and make a 2-digit number. Use one of your colored squares to mark a position on the game board. You can only mark one square per turn.

  • If your 2-digit number is prime, cover a PRIME square.
  • If any of the numbers showing are factors of your 2-digit number, cover one of them.
  • BUT if there’s no square available that matches your number, you lose your turn.

The first player to get three squares in a row (horizontal/vertical/diagonal) wins. Or for a harder challenge, try for four in a row.

Hat tips: Jimmie Lanley.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

And now, on to the main attraction: the blog posts. Many articles were submitted by their authors; others were drawn from the immense backlog in my rss reader. If you’d like to skip directly to your area of interest, click one of these links.

Tweet: Math Teachers at Play #76: a smorgasbord of great ideas for learning, teaching, and playing around with math. http://ctt.ec/fU9Z2+

Click to tweet: Share the carnival with your friends.
(No spam, I promise! You will have a chance to edit or cancel the tweet.)

Continue reading

Math Teachers at Play #78 via 1001 Math Problems

blog carnival 78 graphic

Math Teachers at Play is a traveling collection of math tidbits — games, lesson ideas, and more — from around the Internet. It moves around from month to month, and the September edition is now posted at 1001 Math Problems blog. What a fun list of math posts to browse!

Welcome to the 78th edition of the Math Teachers At Play math education blog carnival, which I am thrilled to be hosting this month in celebration of my soon-to-be-released book, Camp Logic. What is the blog carnival? It is a monthly snapshot of some interesting recent ideas and activities posted by math education bloggers all over the internet.

By tradition, I begin with a fun fact about the number 78:

Seventy-eight is the 12th triangle number, which means that it is the sum of the integers from 1 to 12. Therefore, it is also the total number of gifts given on the last day in the song “The Twelve Days of Christmas!” …

Click here to go read the whole carnival.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Capture

Math Teachers at Play # 77 via Math = Love

MTaP77

Math Teachers at Play is a traveling collection of math tidbits — games, lesson ideas, and more — from around the Internet. It moves around from month to month, and the August edition is now posted at Math = Love blog. What a fun list of math posts to browse!

Welcome to the 77th edition of the Math Teachers at Play Blog Carnival! I’m super excited to be hosting this carnival because I’ve been reading it for years! Yes, I am that crazy person who started reading math teacher blogs as a high school junior. I think you are going to enjoy going through the submissions. I know I found several new-to-me blogs to add to my RSS reader! …

Click here to go read the whole carnival.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


StudentTeam

Math Teachers at Play #76

76[Feature photo (above) by U.S. Army RDECOM. Photo (right) by Stephan Mosel. (CC BY 2.0)]

On your mark… Get set… Go play some math!

Welcome to the 76th edition of the Math Teachers At Play math education blog carnival — a smorgasbord of links to bloggers all around the internet who have great ideas for learning, teaching, and playing around with math from preschool to pre-college.

By tradition, we start the carnival with a puzzle in honor of our 76th edition. But if you would like to jump straight to our featured blog posts, click here to see the Table of Contents.

PUZZLE: CRYSTAL BALL CONNECTION PATTERNS

K4 matchings

In the land of Fantasia, where people communicate by crystal ball, Wizard Mathys has been placed in charge of keeping the crystal connections clean and clear. He decides to figure out how many different ways people might talk to each other, assuming there’s no such thing as a crystal conference call.

Mathys sketches a diagram of four Fantasian friends and their crystal balls. At the top, you can see all the possible connections, but no one is talking to anyone else because it’s naptime. Fantasians take their siesta very seriously. That’s one possible state of the 4-crystal system.

On the second line of the diagram, Joe (in the middle) wakes up from siesta and calls each of his friends in turn. Then the friends take turns calling each other, bringing the total number of possible connection-states up to seven.

Finally, Wizard Mathys imagines what would happen if one friend calls Joe at the same time as the other two are talking to each other. That’s the last line of the diagram: three more possible states. Therefore, the total number of conceivable communication configurations for a 4-crystal system is 10.

For some reason Mathys can’t figure out, mathematicians call the numbers that describe the connection pattern states in his crystal ball communication system Telephone numbers.

TheWizardBySeanMcGrath-small

  • Can you help Wizard Mathys figure out the Telephone numbers for different numbers of people?
    T(0) = ?
    T(1) = ?
    T(2) = ?
    T(3) = ?
    T(4) = 10 connection patterns (as above)
    T(5) = ?
    T(6) = ?
    and so on.

Hint: Don’t forget to count the state of the system when no one is on the phone crystal ball.

[Wizard photo by Sean McGrath. (CC BY 2.0)]


TABLE OF CONTENTS

And now, on to the main attraction: the blog posts. Many articles were submitted by their authors; I’ve drawn others from the immense backlog in my rss reader. If you’d like to skip directly to your area of interest, here’s a quick Table of Contents:

Continue reading

Sconic Sections

Math(s) Teachers At Play #75 via CavMaths

[Feature photo above “Sconic Sections” by Lenore Edman and “75” by R/DV/RS via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).]
75

The monthly math education blog carnival Math Teachers at Play features games, lessons, puzzles, activities, and teaching tips from classroom teachers, homeschoolers, and self-educated learners around the Internet world. Check out the 20 posts of mathematical fun in the June edition:

Math(s) Teachers At Play #75 via CavMaths

Hello, and welcome to the 75th issue of the Math(s) Teachers at Play Blog Carvinal! For those of you who are unaware, a “blog carnival” is a periodic post that travels from blog to blog and has a collection of posts on a certain topic.

This is the first time I’ve hosted a carnival and there were some excellent submissions. I enjoyed reading them all and have discovered some new blogs. I have also input some posts I’ve seen this month which I thought were excellent too…

Click here to go read Math(s) Teachers At Play #75 via CavMaths.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


mtap74

Math Teachers at Play #74 via Triumphant Learning

74 by Stephan Mosel

photo by Stephan Mosel (CC BY 2.0)

The new Math Teachers at Play math education blog carnival is up for your browsing pleasure. Each month, we feature activities, lessons, and games about math topics from preschool through high school. Check it out!

Here’s a peek at a few of the entries:

Origami
Learn how to make Origami Stars, Tessellation Stars, and Chaotic Stars at Math Munch. I think once your students or children see this, you will find Transforming Ninja Stars littering your house and classroom!

Pi
Here’s a fun activity to explore other ways to get the number Pi on the calculator from William Wu at Singapore Maths Tuition.

Math Games
Math Hombre shares a coordinate grid game that also calculates area of rectangles. And all you need is some grid paper and dice.

…And much more!

Click here to go read the entire blog carnival.

Would You Like to Host the Carnival?

Hosting the blog carnival can be a lot of work, but it’s fun to “meet” new bloggers through their submissions. And there’s a side-benefit: The carnival usually brings a nice little spike in traffic to your blog. If you think you’d like to join in the fun, read the instructions on our Math Teachers at Play page. Then leave a comment or email me to let me know which month you’d like to take.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


wordle73

Math Teachers at Play #73 via Singapore Maths Tuition

Maze photo by woodleywonderworks (CC BY 2.0)

woodleywonderworks (CC BY 2.0)

The monthly math education blog carnival Math Teachers at Play features games, lessons, puzzles, activities, and teaching tips from classroom teachers, homeschoolers, and self-educated learners around the Internet world. Check out the 15 posts of mathematical fun in April’s edition:

Here’s a peek at a few of the entries:

Check out the following awesome blogs!

Math Strategies
There is such an emphasis on learning math facts that our children do not spend enough time learning strategies that will help them solve math problems. Read about two types of strategies for solving math problems—working left to right and regrouping into what you know.
– Crystal Wagner

Nim Games
This is a game that is generally used to show how math can be involved in game play. I explain the rules of the game as well as the mathematical strategy involved. There is also a script where users can compete against the computer
– Aftermath

Day 85 – Related Rates
Two separate trucks carrying a very long wind turbine blade need to turn the corner. Describe how their speeds vary throughout the turn. The blog is dedicated to these types of discussion starters, at all levels.
– Curmudgeon

Click here to go read the entire blog carnival!

Would You Like to Host the Carnival?

Hosting the blog carnival can be a lot of work, but it’s fun to “meet” new bloggers through their submissions. And there’s a side-benefit: The carnival usually brings a nice little spike in traffic to your blog. If you think you’d like to join in the fun, read the instructions on our Math Teachers at Play page. Then leave a comment or email me to let me know which month you’d like to take.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


72pencils

Math Teachers at Play #72 via Christy’s Houseful of Chaos

mathteachersplay72

[Feature photo above is 72 Pencils by fdecomite via flickr.]

Math Teachers at Play is a traveling blog carnival. It moves around from month to month, and the March edition is now posted at Christy’s Houseful of Chaos. What a fun list of math posts to browse!

This is the 72nd Edition of the Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) blog carnival!

The number 72 is a Harshad number in number bases from binary up to but excluding base 13. Harshad numbers are numbers that are divisible by the sum of their numbers. They are base-dependant. In binary 72 is expressed 1001000. Add the digits together to get 2, one of the factors of 72. With a base of 5, 72 is expressed 242. With base 6 it is expressed 200. You can play around checking the bases of different numbers with an online calculator.

Now on to the math posts….

Click here to go read the whole carnival.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #71 via Math Mama Writes

The February math education blog carnival is now posted for your browsing pleasure, featuring 71 playful ways to explore mathematics from preschool to calculus:

71 richard schwartzMath teachers at play know that math is best learned when the student is thoroughly engaged, through their body, their imagination (story-telling), or the world of games. I’ve started out this month’s post with those three categories.

Most of the submissions this month described hands-on, or feet-on, activities. It’s as if there had been a theme agreed upon without anyone mentioning it. Some of the following posts are from submissions, and others are posts that I wanted to share from my internet wanderings.

This post has 71 links. (You might need to digest it in smaller bites.) Enjoy!

Click here to go read the whole, wonderful post.


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Reimann-hexagon

Math Teachers at Play #70

800px-Brauchtum_gesteck_70_1[Feature photo above by David Reimann via Bridges 2013 Gallery. Number 70 (right) from Wikimedia Commons (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0).]

Do you enjoy math? I hope so! If not, browsing this post just may change your mind.

Welcome to the 70th edition of the Math Teachers At Play math education blog carnival — a smorgasbord of 42+ links to bloggers all around the internet who have great ideas for learning, teaching, and playing around with math from preschool to pre-college. Let the mathematical fun begin!

By tradition, we start the carnival with a puzzle in honor of our 70th edition. But if you would like to jump straight to our featured blog posts, click here to see the Table of Contents.

Click here to continue reading.

Math Teachers at Play Blog Carnival #69 via Kids Math Teacher

mtap69wordle

The new Math Teachers at Play blog carnival is up for your browsing pleasure. Featured articles include activities and enrichment from preschool through high school:

“While my site focuses on elementary level math concepts, I strongly think that young kids can understand complex concepts that are not taught until much later (and I think most math teachers feel that way. Do you agree?). The Math Teachers at Play Blog Carnival can contain math concepts/topics from Pre-school to Calculus.

“This month for December’s carnival there were 12 days of Christmas entries! I put them in order starting from earliest math to the most advanced math…”

Click here to go read the Blog Carnival post at Kids Math Teacher.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #68 via Mathematical Mischief

CERDEC Math and Science Summer Camp, 2013

[Photo by U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.]

The Math Teachers at Play blog carnival is a monthly blogging round-up shared at a different blog each month, featuring posts from parents, teachers, homeschoolers, and students — anyone who is interested in playing around with school-level (preschool to pre-college) or recreational math.

This month’s edition is ready for your browsing pleasure:

Enjoy!

Good morning, everybody! This month’s edition of Math Teachers at Play is edition number 68. Also known as edition number {{2}^{2}}({{2}^{4}+1}). Or edition 31+37 or edition 7+61…. Alrighty, so… did you know that 68 is a happy number? That’s right, it’s not unhappy, it quite likes the way it is.

There’s certain numbers that exist that are ‘happy’ numbers. This is because the sum of the square of their digits is equal to 1. So, for 68, the two digits are 6 and 8. Adding the squares, we’re given {{6}^{2}}+{{8}^{2}}, which equates to 100. Adding the square of each of the digits makes 1, which is happy!

  • Can you find some more happy numbers?
    I’ll give you a hint – the first one is 1.

Anyway, back to the carnival. This carnival features 11 articles – smaller than last time, but still just as awesome and creative as ever….

Click here to go read the whole carnival: 11 great ideas for teaching math!
[By the way, did you notice? 11 is a happy number, too.]

You may also enjoy:


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #67 via Moebius Noodles

MathTeachersAtPlay67

This month’s Math Teachers at Play blog carnival features games, activities, and playful math from preschool to high school. Here are just a few treats from the carnival:

  • proofs for elementary students
  • Barbie does math
  • the dangers of timed testing
  • a puzzle for factoring trinomials
  • Minecraft math
  • coordinate graph-iti
  • and much more

It’s great fun! If you’re interested in how children learn math, check it out:


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Carnival Parade in Aachen 2007

Math Teachers at Play #66

[Feature photo above by Franz & P via flickr. Route 66 sign by Sam Howzit via flickr. (CC BY 2.0)]
Route 66 Sign

Welcome to the Math Teachers At Play blog carnival — which is not just for math teachers! If you like to learn new things and play around with ideas, you are sure to find something of interest.

By tradition, we start the carnival with a couple of puzzles in honor of our 66th edition.

Let the mathematical fun begin!

Puzzle 1

how crazy 66

Our first puzzle is based on one of my favorite playsheets from the Miquon Math workbook series. Fill each shape with an expression that equals the target number. Can you make some cool, creative math?

Click the image to download the pdf playsheet set: one page has the target number 66, and a second page is blank so you can set your own target number.

Continue reading

photo by Martin Pettitt via flickr

Math Teachers at Play #65 via Mathematics and Multimedia

photo by Martin Pettitt via flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The new Math Teachers at Play blog carnival is up for your browsing pleasure. Featured articles include activities and enrichment from preschool through high school:

Welcome to the 65th edition of Math Teachers at Play. First let us have some trivia about 65.

  • First, 65 is the smallest integer that can be expressed as the sum of two distinct positive squares in two ways:
    65 = 82 + 12
    = 72 + 42.
  • Second, 65 is the length of the hypotenuse of 4 different Pythagorean Triangles:
    652 = 162 + 632
    = 332 + 562
    = 392 + 522
    = 252 + 602.
  • Third, 65 = 15 + 24 + 33 + 42 + 51.
  • Lastly, 65 is the traditional age for retirement in the United States, the United Kingdom, and other countries including my beloved Philippines.

And now, let the math carnival begin! …

Click here to go read Math Teachers at Play 65: Teach, Learn and Enjoy.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #64 via Mathematical Mischief

The Math Teachers at Play blog carnival is a monthly blogging round-up shared at a different blog each month, featuring posts from parents, teachers, homeschoolers, and students — anyone who is interested in playing around with school-level (preschool to pre-college) or recreational math.

This month’s edition is ready for your browsing pleasure:

Enjoy!


Welcome to my humble online abode! Take a seat – I’ve lost the carnival number under a chunk of paperwork. Whoops…
Wait, you might be able to help me out! Would you like to help me out?
The following sequences contain the missing carnival number – I’m a bit stuck, and I need your help!
Can you tell me what the next number is? There’s a prize!

16, 32, 48, …
100, 81, … , 49, 36
103, 90, 77, …
2, 4, 8, 16, 32, …

Click here to read the math carnival post.

Or go back to explore some of the old MTAP blog carnivals:


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #63 via Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks

Hooray for Friday! Let’s celebrate by visiting this month’s Math Teachers at Play blog carnival, featuring mathematical activities, lessons, and games for all ages:

Hmm… let’s see… now where did I put my notes? I know that this is supposed to be the Math Teachers at Play blog carnival… but which one?

Maybe the following puzzle will help. In the grid below, do the following:

  • Circle any number, then cross out the other numbers in the same row and column.

Click here to read the entire post at Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks blog.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #62

by Robert Webb

Do you enjoy math? I hope so! If not, browsing this post just may change your mind. Welcome to the Math Teachers At Play blog carnival — a smorgasbord of ideas for learning, teaching, and playing around with math from preschool to pre-college.

Let the mathematical fun begin!

POLYHEDRON PUZZLE

By tradition, we start the carnival with a puzzle in honor of our 62nd edition:

An Archimedean solid is a polyhedron made of two or more types of regular polygons meeting in identical vertices. A rhombicosidodecahedron (see image above) has 62 sides: triangles, squares, and pentagons.

  • How many of each shape does it take to make a rhombicosidodecahedron?
Click for full-size template.

Click for template.

My math club students had fun with a Polyhedra Construction Kit. Here’s how to make your own:

  1. Collect a bunch of empty cereal boxes. Cut the boxes open to make big sheets of cardboard.
  2. Print out the template page (→) and laminate. Cut out each polygon shape, being sure to include the tabs on the sides.
  3. Turn your cardboard brown-side-up and trace around the templates, making several copies of each polygon. I recommend 20 each of the pentagon and hexagon, 40 each of the triangle and square.
  4. Draw the dark outline of each polygon with a ballpoint pen, pressing hard to score the cardboard so the tabs will bend easily.
  5. Cut out the shapes, being careful around the tabs.
  6. Use small rubber bands to connect the tabs. Each rubber band will hold two tabs together, forming one edge of a polyhedron.

So, for instance, it takes six squares and twelve rubber bands to make a cube. How many different polyhedra (plural of polyhedron) will you make?

  • Can you build a rhombicosidodecahedron?

And now, on to the main attraction: the 62 blog posts. Many of the following articles were submitted by their authors; others were drawn from the immense backlog in my blog reader. If you’d like to skip directly to your area of interest, here’s a quick Table of Contents:

Continue reading

Math Teachers at Play #61 via Math Hombre

Come join the fun!

The Math Teachers at Play blog carnival is a monthly blogging round-up shared at a different blog each month, featuring posts from parents, teachers, homeschoolers, and students — anyone who is interested in playing around with school-level (preschool to pre-college) or recreational math.

This month’s edition is ready for your browsing pleasure:

Enjoy!


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #60 via White Group Mathematics

Due to an apparent glitch with the submissions, it’s a frustratingly short carnival this month. But you will still find plenty of fun, from elementary kitchen math to algebra 2 and fractions to fractals:

The number sixty happens to be the smallest number divisible by the numbers 1 to 6. Also, it has the honour being a unitary perfect number, i.e. it can be interpreted as being the overall sum of its unitary divisors (excluding itself). Give this a try to convince yourself: 1 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 12 + 15 + 20 indeed equals 60.

Click here to read the math carnival post.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


Math Teachers at Play #59 @ Learners in Bloom

Math Teachers at Play is a monthly Blog Carnival showcasing math activities and puzzles from teachers, parents, and homeschoolers all around the blogosphere.

It is organized by Denise Gaskins at Let’s Play Math, and I’m very excited to be hosting the 59th carnival on Learners in Bloom.

Here’s a little puzzle for you:

59 is the smallest prime that can be expressed using the digits 1 through 9 in order with only the addition and multiplication symbols between them. Can you find a way to express it with these rules? (one solution is at the end of this post).

And now on to the great ideas that were submitted this month…

Click here to read the whole article.


Get all our new math tips and games:  Subscribe in a reader, or get updates by Email.


fryeburg-fair-by-alex-kehr

Math Teachers at Play #58

No 58 - gold on blue[Feature photo (above) by Alex Kehr. Photo (right) by kirstyhall via flickr.]

Welcome to the Math Teachers At Play blog carnival — a smorgasbord of ideas for learning, teaching, and playing around with math from preschool to pre-college. If you like to learn new things and play around with ideas, you are sure to find something of interest.

Let the mathematical fun begin…

PUZZLE 1

By tradition, we start the carnival with a pair of puzzles in honor of our 58th edition. Click to download the pdf:

How CRAZY Can You Make It

PUZZLE 2

A Smith number is an integer the sum of whose digits is equal to the sum of the digits in its prime factorization.

Got that? Well, 58 will help us to get a better grasp on that definition. Observe:

58 = 2 × 29

and

5 + 8 = 13
2 + 2 + 9 = 13

And that’s all there is to it! I suppose we might say that 58’s last name is Smith. [Nah! Better not.]

  • What is the only Smith number that’s less than 10?
  • There are four more two-digit Smith numbers. Can you find them?

And now, on to the main attraction: the blog posts. Many articles were submitted by their authors; others were drawn from the immense backlog in my Google Reader. Enjoy!

Continue reading

Math Teachers at Play #57 via So I Teach Math and Coach?

From preschool through high school, mathematics offers a wide range of puzzles, games, and interesting ideas to explore. The Math Teachers at Play blog carnival brings you a variety of mathy treats every month. Check it out!

Math Teachers at Play #57

Welcome to the 57th Edition of Math Teachers at Play the Blog Carnival!

The number 57 has often been used in entertainment. As in Agent 57 from the Hit TV Show Danger Mouse, Bruce Springsteen once sang about 57 channels (and nothin’ on), and I can’t forget one of my favorite movies Passenger 57 staring Wesley Snipes.

Click here to read this month’s entries.


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Math Teachers at Play #56 via Another Step To Take…

Would you like to learn about math books, games, puzzles, teaching tips, and more? Check out this month’s Math Teachers at Play:

Math Teachers at Play is a Blog Carnival for teachers, parents, homeschoolers and anyone else interested in learning and teaching mathematics.

According to the tradition of MTaP we start with some trivia related to edition number. Fifty six is a tetrahedral number, the sum of the first six triangular numbers. To model this number we laid out tiles to for the triangular numbers and then stacked them…

Click here to read the whole post.


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Math Teachers at Play #55 via Mathematical Palette

If you are looking for some mathematical inspiration, check out this month’s Math Teachers at Play blog carnival. It’s full of activity and game ideas, puzzles and problems, and interesting mathematics for students in elementary, middle, or high school. Enjoy!

Welcome to the 55th edition of the Mathematics Teachers at Play Blog Carnival. The number 55 is the 10th Fibonacci number and the sum of the first 10 counting numbers.

Below are the entries to the 55th edition of the Math Teachers at Play Blog Carnival…

Click here to read the whole carnival post.

Photo by Sam via flickr.


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Math Teachers at Play #54 via Epsilon-Delta

Looks like a treasure trove of mathy fun from preschool to calculus at this month’s Math Teachers at Play blog carnival. Check it out!

Welcome to the fifty-fourth edition of Math Teachers at Play! We have a great roundup of articles this month…

  • Literacy
  • Instruction
  • Gamification
  • Great Advice and Insight

Go read the whole thing at Epsilon-Delta blog.


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Math Teachers at Play #53 via Motion Math Blog

We’re excited to celebrate the availability of Motion Math’s Pro editions and Motion Math: Hungry Guppy with this week’s Math Teachers at Play blog carnival, a monthly round-up of math-related blogs. We had some great submissions we’re excited to share with you — thanks to everyone who participated!

Let’s start with some math learning experiences —

Go read the post at Motion Math Blog!


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Math Teachers at Play #52

[Photo by bumeister1 via flickr.]

Welcome to the Math Teachers At Play blog carnival — which is not just for math teachers! We have games, lessons, and learning activities from preschool math to calculus. If you like to learn new things and play around with mathematical ideas, you are sure to find something of interest.

Scattered between all the math blog links, I’ve included highlights from the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice, which describe the types of expertise that teachers at all levels — whether in traditional, experimental, or home schools — should seek to develop in their math students.

Let the mathematical fun begin…

TRY THESE PUZZLES

By tradition, we start the carnival with a couple of puzzles in honor of our 52nd edition. Since there are 52 playing cards in a standard deck, I chose two card puzzles from the Maths Is Fun Card Puzzles page:

  • A blind-folded man is handed a deck of 52 cards and told that exactly 10 of these cards are facing up. How can he divide the cards into two piles (which may be of different sizes) with each pile having the same number of cards facing up?
  • What is the smallest number of cards you must take from a 52-card deck to be guaranteed at least one four-of-a-kind?

The answers are at Maths Is Fun, but don’t look there. Having someone give you the answer is no fun at all!

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