Math Teachers at Play #84 via Math Hombre

Rectangles, fractions, prime factorization, dancing, puzzles, great books, and so much more — check out all the fun at the March Math education blog carnival:

But Before You Go…

I’m running out of carnival hosts! Would you like to volunteer? It’s a bit of work, but great fun, too. Leave a comment here, or send me an email.

Excerpt:

Welcome to the 84th Math Teachers at Play Blog Carnival!
MTaP84

84 is a portentous number. It’s the sum of twin primes (What’s the previous sum of twin primes? Next?). It’s thrice perfect, twice everything. It’s positively Orwellian. It’s even a town in Pennsylvania.

84 puzzler 1:
Number the intersections of these five circles with the integers 1 to 20 so that the points on each circle sum to the same.

It was a good month for math reading related posts …

Click here to go read the math blog carnival.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Education Bloggers: Share Your Post!

photo by Omar Omar via flickr[Image by Omar Omar (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.]

Please Note: We need volunteers to host future carnivals! See below for more information.

If you are a homeschooler or classroom teacher, student or independent learner, or anyone else who writes about math, now is the time to send in your favorite blog post for next week’s Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival.

Have you noticed a new math blogger on your block that you’d like to introduce to the rest of us? Feel free to submit another blogger’s post in addition to your own. Beginning bloggers are often shy about sharing, but like all of us, they love finding new readers.

Tweet: Education Bloggers: Share Your Post! Math Teachers at Play blog carnival taking entries for March edition. http://ctt.ec/WxJ5Y+ Don’t procrastinate: The deadline for entries is this Friday, March 20. The carnival will be posted next week at Math Hombre.

Click to tweet about the carnival.
(No spam, I promise! You will have a chance to edit or cancel the tweet.)

Continue reading Education Bloggers: Share Your Post!

Happy Birthday, General Relativity

Don’t forget that Pi Day is also Albert Einstein’s birthday! And this year marks the 100th anniversary of his Theory of General Relativity. So Science Magazine has a special Einstein issue online, featuring this interactive comic:

comic-image

You may also enjoy:


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Pi: Who Needs That Many Digits?

From Numberphile: Pi is famously calculated to trillions of digits – but Dr. James Grime says 39 is enough.

How you round it off makes a difference:

An extra note from Dr. Grime: “Since pi39 ends in 0, you may think we could use pi38 instead, which has even fewer digits. Unfortunately, the rounding errors of pi38 are ten times larger than the rounding errors of pi39 — more than a hydrogen atom. So that extra decimal place makes a difference, even if it’s 0.”


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Pi and Buffon’s Matches

From Numberphile: Dr Tony Padilla’s unique (and low budget) twist on the Buffon’s Needle experiment to learn the true value of Pi.

For a kid-friendly version of this experiment, try throwing food:

Do you have a favorite family activity for celebrating Pi Day? I’d love to hear it!


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Unending Digits… Why Not Keep It Simple?

Unending-digits

Unending digits …
Why not keep it simple, like
Twenty-two sevenths?

—Luke Anderson

Math Poetry Activity

Encourage your students to make their own Pi Day haiku with these tips from Mr. L’s Math:

And remember, Pi Day is also Albert Einstein’s birthday! Check out this series of short videos about his life and work: Happy Birthday, Einstein.

Wednesday Wisdom features a quote to inspire my fellow homeschoolers and math education peeps. Today’s quote is from Luke Anderson, via TeachPi.org. Background photo courtesy of Robert Couse-Baker (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


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