Math Teachers and Homeschool Bloggers: We Want You!

chica usando ordenador[Photo by Olga Berrios via flickr.]

Do you have a favorite blog post about math activities, games, lessons, or hands-on fun? The Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival would love to feature your article!

We welcome math topics from preschool through the first year of calculus. Old posts are welcome, as long as they haven’t been published in past editions of this carnival.

Don’t procrastinate: The deadline for entries is Friday, June 19. The carnival will be posted next week at CavMaths.

Would You Like to Host the Carnival?

Hosting the blog carnival is fun because you get to “meet” new bloggers through their submissions. And there’s a side-benefit: The carnival often brings a nice little spike in traffic to your blog. If you think you’d like to join in the fun, read the instructions on our Math Teachers at Play page. Then leave a comment or email me to let me know which month you’d like to take.

Explore the Other Math Carnivals

While you’re waiting for next week’s Math Teachers at Play carnival, you may enjoy:


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Socks Are Like Pants, Cats Are Like Dogs

Support This New Book from Natural Math

Socks Are Like Pants, Cats Are Like Dogs by Malke Rosenfeld and Gordon Hamilton is filled with a diverse collection of math games, puzzles, and activities exploring the mathematics of choosing, identifying and sorting. The activities are easy to start and require little preparation.

The publisher’s crowdfunding goal is $4,000. The book is almost ready to go to press, and I can hardly wait to see it!


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Review Game: Once Through the Deck

[Feature photo above by Shannon (shikiro famu) via Flicker (CC BY 2.0).]

Math Concepts: basic facts of addition, multiplication.
Players: one.
Equipment: one deck of math cards (poker- or bridge-style playing cards with the face cards and jokers removed).

The best way to practice the math facts is through the give-and-take of conversation, orally quizzing each other and talking about how you might figure the answers out. But occasionally your child may want a simple, solitaire method for review.

How to Play

Shuffle the deck and place it face down on the table in front of you. Flip the cards face up, one at a time.

For each card, say out loud the sum (or product) of that number plus (or times) the number you want to practice. Don’t say the whole equation, just the answer.

Go through the deck as fast as you can. But don’t try to go so fast that you have to guess! If you are not sure of the answer, stop and figure it out.

History

Brian at The Math Mojo Chronicles demonstrates the game in this video, which my daughter so thoroughly enjoyed that she immediately ran to find a deck of cards and practiced her times-4 facts. It’s funny, sometimes, what will catch a child’s interest.


Multiplication-Games

This game first appeared as part of my Times Table Series and will be included in the upcoming Math You Can Play multiplication book, planned for late 2015.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


New Internet Math Reference Pages

The Internet boasts a wide-ranging assortment of math websites, and for years I maintained (or mostly neglected) a huge page of reference links. This spring I’ve been working on the paperback edition of my book‌—‌with its appendix of favorite books and internet sites‌—‌and I decided to revise my blog links to match.

Blogging while we watch the tide come in. :)
Blogging while we watch the tide come in.

So this week, I’m in Jeju, South Korea, visiting my daughter who teaches English there. In between seeing touristy sites and gorging ourselves on amazingly delicious food, she took me to a beautiful coffee shop that overlooks the beach in Aewol.

Great place to work on my blog!

The long monster list morphed into eight topical pages. I hope you find something useful.

Playing tourist with two of my daughters at Halla Arboretum.
Playing tourist with two of my daughters at Halla Arboretum.

I will try to keep these pages up to date, but the Internet is volatile. If you find a broken link, you can search for the website by name or enter the defunct URL into the Internet Wayback Machine at Archive.org.

Changing of the guard at Old City Hall, Jeju-si.
Changing of the guard at Old City Hall, Jeju-si.

And if you know of a fantastic website I’ve missed, please send me an email (LetsPlayMath@gmail.com, or use the comment form on my “About” page). I appreciate your help.


Feature photo above by Fractal Ken via Flickr (CC BY 2.0). Korea photos ©2015 Denise Gaskins, all rights reserved. For more math resource suggestions, check out my Math with Living Books pages. They’re not finished yet, but I’ll be working on them next.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Math Teachers at Play #85 via ZenoMath

Feature photo above by epSos .de via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).

There’s a feast of mathematical games and activities at this month’s Math Teachers at Play blog carnival Enjoy!

86-Purple-fact

Math Teachers at Play is a monthly blog carnival that compiles posts from several blogs under the theme of teaching math in unique and innovative ways. We’re thrilled to partner with them this edition and couldn’t help ourselves from including some interesting trivia and riddles centered on our edition number – Happy Number 86!

Happy Numbers are numbers whose digits are such that – when squared and added iteratively, the number 1 is reached. For example,

82 + 62 = 100
12 + 02 + 02 = 1
So 86 is a happy number!

Click here to read the carnival post at ZenoMath.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Puzzle: Crystal Ball Connection Patterns

K4 matchings

In the land of Fantasia, where people communicate by crystal ball, Wizard Mathys has been placed in charge of keeping the crystal connections clean and clear. He decides to figure out how many different ways people might talk to each other, assuming there’s no such thing as a crystal conference call.

Mathys sketches a diagram of four Fantasian friends and their crystal balls. At the top, you can see all the possible connections, but no one is talking to anyone else because it’s naptime. Fantasians take their siesta very seriously. That’s one possible state of the 4-crystal system.

On the second line of the diagram, Joe (in the middle) wakes up from siesta and calls each of his friends in turn. Then the friends take turns calling each other, bringing the total number of possible connection-states up to seven.

Finally, Wizard Mathys imagines what would happen if one friend calls Joe at the same time as the other two are talking to each other. That’s the last line of the diagram: three more possible states. Therefore, the total number of conceivable communication configurations for a 4-crystal system is 10.

For some reason Mathys can’t figure out, mathematicians call the numbers that describe the connection pattern states in his crystal ball communication system Telephone numbers.

TheWizardBySeanMcGrath-small

  • Can you help Wizard Mathys figure out the Telephone numbers for different numbers of people?
    T(0) = ?
    T(1) = ?
    T(2) = ?
    T(3) = ?
    T(4) = 10 connection patterns (as above)
    T(5) = ?
    T(6) = ?
    and so on.

Hint: Don’t forget to count the state of the system when no one is on the phone crystal ball.


Feature photo at top of post by Christian Schnettelker (web designer) and wizard photo by Sean McGrath via Flickr. (CC BY 2.0) This puzzle was originally featured in the Math Teachers At Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival: MTaP #76.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Calling All Math Teacher Bloggers and Homeschoolers: Carnival Time!

by Bob Jagendorf via flickr[Image by Bob Jagendorf (CC BY-NC 2.0) via Flickr.]

The monthly Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival is almost here. If you’ve written a blog post about math, we’d love to have you join us! Each of us can help others learn, so in a sense we are all teachers.

Posts must be relevant to students or teachers of school-level mathematics (that is, anything from preschool up to first-year calculus). Old posts are welcome, as long as they haven’t been published in past editions of this carnival.

Have you noticed a new math blogger on your block that you’d like to introduce to the rest of us? Feel free to submit another blogger’s post in addition to your own. Beginning bloggers are often shy about sharing, but like all of us, they love finding new readers.

Don’t procrastinate: The deadline for entries is this Friday, May 22. The carnival will be posted next week at ZenoMath.

Would You Like to Host the Carnival?

Thank you so much to the volunteer bloggers who have stepped up to carry this MTaP math education blog carnival through the summer! I would never be able to keep the carnival going on my own.

If you’d like to join in the fun, we have openings for the 2015-2016 school year. Read the instructions on our Math Teachers at Play page. Then leave a comment or email me to let me know which month you’d like to take.

Explore the Other Math Carnivals

While you’re waiting for next week’s Math Teachers at Play carnival, you may enjoy:


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


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