Math(s) Teachers at Play #88 via mathematicsandcoding

From elementary to high school, manipulatives to Minecraft, there’s plenty of fun to be had at this month’s math education blog carnival:

Enjoy!
MTAP88

So, here is issue 88 of the Math(s) Teachers at Play blog carnival. This acts as a round up of some cool blog posts that have been published since issue 87 over at cavmaths. As usual people have submitted entries, which I will supplement with some posts that I have really enjoyed reading in the last few weeks.

Click here to read the blog carnival post at mathematicsandcoding.


[Feature photo (top) by Pratham Books, 88 cards photo by Bailey Weaver, both via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).]


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Noticing Fractions in a Sidewalk

fraction-circle

My daughters didn’t want to admit to knowing me, when I stopped to take a picture of the sidewalk along a back street during our trip to Jeju. But aren’t those some wonderful fractions?

What do you see? What do you wonder?

Here is one of the relationships I noticed in the outer ring:

\frac{4 \frac {2}{2}}{20} = \frac {1}{4}

sidewalk

And this one’s a little trickier:

\frac{1 \frac {1}{2}}{12} = \frac {1}{8}

Can you find it in the picture?

Each square of the sidewalk is made from four smaller tiles, about 25 cm square, cut from lava rock. Some of the sidewalk tiles are cut from mostly-smooth rock, some bubbly, and some half-n-half.

I wonder how far we could go before we had to repeat a circle pattern?

Join the Summer Math Photo Challenge

How to Play: Take a walk around your neighborhood to see what sort of math you can find. Post a photo to Twitter or Instagram, with hashtags to mark it as a Summer Math Challenge photo. Describe what you’re seeing. Re-tweet and share others’ photos if you like. Encourage your friends to play!


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Murphy Strikes My Paperbacks :(

The colors are supposed to go all the way off the edge.
The colors are supposed to go all the way off the edge. They worked just fine in the pre-publication proof…
Murphy’s Law struck today, and the paperback books that looked so good in the proof copies turned out to have a cover glitch, at least in the ones I ordered from Amazon. I’m working with CreateSpace to make sure it gets straightened out—but that means the books may show up as “unavailable” for awhile.

As with any print-on-demand glitch, if you got a badly printed book you can ask Customer Support to replace it.

It could be worse. The interior of the book is fine, at least in my copy. And of course, the ebook versions are totally unaffected.

If you are trying to use the discount code for newsletter subscribers, remember that it’s good through the end of the month. I may even extend the expiration date, if this cover problem persists, but I sure hope to have it fixed in a couple of days.


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


30% Discount for Email Newsletter Subscribers

Counting-GamesAddition-Games600x800[Feature photo (above) by Glen Wright via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).]

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if math was something your children WANTED to do?

With the Math You Can Play series, your kids can practice their math skills by playing games with basic items you already have around the house, such as playing cards and dice.

Paperback editions of the first two Math You Can Play books will be out any day now. If you’re subscribed to my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email newsletter, I’ll be sending you a 30% discount code by Thursday, or as soon as both books pass through the last few publishing hoops…

If you haven’t subscribed yet, check it out!

Update: If you ARE subscribed to my newsletter, but you don’t receive a discount code by this weekend, please email and let me know. We had a bit of trouble with a few of the automated subscription entries, so I may need to fix up your account by hand.
gmail address
(Or use the Contact Form on my About page.)


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Education Bloggers: Share Your Post!

photo by Omar Omar via flickr
photo by Omar Omar via flickr

If you are a homeschooler or classroom teacher, student or independent learner, or anyone else who writes about math, now is the time to send in your favorite blog post for next week’s Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival.

Don’t procrastinate: The deadline for entries is this Friday, July 24. The carnival will be posted next week at mathematicsandcoding.

If you haven’t written anything about math lately, here are some ideas to get your creative juices flowing…

Need an Idea-Starter?

  • Elementary Concepts: As Liping Ma showed, there is more to understanding and teaching elementary mathematics than we often realize. Do you have a game, activity, or anecdote about teaching math to young students? Please share!
  • Arithmetic/Pre-Algebra: This section is for arithmetic lessons and number theory puzzles at the middle-school-and-beyond level. We would love to hear your favorite math club games, numerical investigations, or contest-preparation tips.
  • Beginning Algebra and Geometry: Can you explain why we never divide by zero, how to bisect an angle, or what is wrong with distributing the square in the expression \left(a + b \right)^2 ? Struggling students need your help! Share your wisdom about basic algebra and geometry topics here.
  • Advanced Math: Like most adults, I have forgotten enough math to fill several textbooks. I’m eager to learn again, but math books can be so-o-o tedious. Can you make upper-level math topics come alive, so they will stick in my (or a student’s) mind?
  • Mathematical Recreations: What kind of math do you do, just for the fun of it?
  • About Teaching Math: Other teachers’ blogs are an important factor in my continuing education. The more I read about the theory and practice of teaching math, the more I realize how much I have yet to learn. So please, fellow teachers, don’t be shy — share your insights!

Would You Like to Host the Carnival?

Hosting the blog carnival can be a lot of work, but it’s fun to “meet” new bloggers through their submissions. And there’s a side-benefit: The carnival usually brings a nice little spike in traffic to your blog. If you think you’d like to join in the fun, read the instructions on our Math Teachers at Play page. Then leave a comment or email me to let me know which month you’d like to take.

Explore the Other Math Carnivals

While you’re waiting for next week’s Math Teachers at Play carnival, you may enjoy:


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Playful Math Snacks: Proofs Without Words

The July “Let’s Play Math” newsletter went out earlier this week to everyone who signed up for Tabletop Academy Press math updates. Inspired by my recent Infinite Cake post, this month’s issue focuses on math proofs without words. What fun!

If you’re not on the mailing list, you can still join in the play:

And remember: Newsletter subscribers are always the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions.

A Preview

sloyd square

Math Snack: Proofs Without Words
Playful, no-preparation math activities for all ages

Our first proof is a diagram from Paper Sloyd. Fold a square in half diagonally, both ways. Unfold. What do you see? Can you say anything about the shapes, lines, or angles? How do you know? Now, fold in the four corners of the paper square so they meet at the center. What new relationships can you find?

When using proofs without words, don’t try to force your kids in a particular direction. What I see here is that the tilted square (formed by connecting the midpoints of each side) has exactly half the area of the larger square—‌but your students may find something else. The point is to have a good discussion. Begin with Annie Fetter’s key questions: “What do you notice? What do you wonder?” or similar idea-generators: “What is going on? Have you seen something like this before? Are there other ways of looking at it?”

Here’s another picture with squares…


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


Most Difficult Math Fact in the Whole Times Table

7-8 sign

Happy Multiplication Day!

For help learning the Times Table facts, check out my multiplication blog post series:

Encourage your family to play with math every day:


Tabletop Academy PressGet monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.


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